Breakthrough Leadership

In 2008 Kenichi Ohmae’s “Business Breakthrough, Inc.” filmed 14 episodes of me ranting and raving about “Breakthrough Leadership”. (Ohmae-san is famous for having directed McKinsey’s Japan and Asia Pacific operations, and writing many popular business books, like The Borderless World” and “The Mind of the Strategist”.) It was a thoroughly terrifying experience, which I described in gory detail in a previous blog. Someday soon they’ll be shown on Japanese business TV. Here are the Power Points for the first episode. It’s just not the same without the video (as with all PPT, you might be tempted to say “I don’t FEEL the power and I certainly don’t SEE the point!”), but for now it will have to do. Let me know if you want a copy of this first set for your very own and I’ll send you a pdf. The who series of PPT can be viewed on slideshare by clicking on the link above the PPT in this blog.

In the videos that accompany the PPT, I speak quite slowly so that non-native English speakers will be able to easily understand what I’m saying, even when I’m ranting. (They’ll be sold through BBI.) Let me know if you want to hear when they are released (kimberly@wiefling.com) and I’ll drop you a line and a link. You can always play them with the sound off to amuse your cat! – Kimberly

No Oxygen at the Top – Project Management Challenges at the Everest of Organizations

bth_everestIf you’ve ever been inside of a tin of sardines you will have a pretty good idea of what it’s like to ride the subways of Tokyo during rush hour – only in the subway the sardines are still alive. Even though we are packed together with greater intimacy than most sexual encounters, my inscrutable Japanese companions manage to wear a mask of serenity and composure. Most of my fellow riders have their eyes fixed on their mobile phones, looking up train schedules, checking email, texting their pals, or doing a little shopping on-line. These 21st century urban dwellers use their phones for everything! (I’m told that the average mobile phone purchase in Japan is over $50!) My phone works there, but it costs a bundle per minute, something approaching the cost of a college education, so I tend not to use it much. Instead, I’m looking around to see if anyone else notices that those of us fortunate enough to have a seat have our faces at crotch-level with the people standing.Continue reading

There is No "I" in TEAM

teamcircle.jpgThomas Edison, when asked why he had a team of twenty-one assistants “If I could solve all the problems myself, I would.”  Another rather amusing fellow I know said “There is no “I” in TEAM, but there is an “I” in WIN!”  Whatever your philosophy, working in a team is challenging, especially when separated by distance and time zones.  Team work requires taking into account the views of others with whom you may not agree, and working with people who may seem irritating, stubborn, or just plain sociopathic at times.  And there is always some level of conflict, which most people don’t enjoy (although some people argue for sport!), so the road of “journey shared” can be a bit rocky at times.Here are some survival tips based on my 20 years of working in teams:

AVOID TEAM WORK!

–          Well, only if you don’t NEED a team, of course!  If you can accomplish the goals without investing your time and energy into building a team, avoid working in a team.  Teams should only be used to accomplish what cannot be accomplished alone.  If you are playing a game that only a team can win, you’d better have a team!

“If you want to go fast, go alone.  If you want to go far, go with others.” – African Proverb

CHOOSE TEAMMATES CAREFULLY

–          OK, we don’t always have a choice of who’s on our team.  But, your individual success will be tied to the success of the team, so when you do have a choice, be selective in choosing teammates.  Personality clashes and lack of shared values are a recipe for lots of angst and very little progress.  I’ve quit plenty of teams, and even jobs, to escape torturous teammates.  Life is just too short!Continue reading


Kimberly's Areas of Expertise

Contact Kimberly at:
Wiefling Consulting

Phone +1 650 867 0847

Books in the Scrappy Guides™ Series

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